Posts Tagged ‘Davis WV dining’

Shopping in Amish Country Near Davis, WV

Saturday, June 12th, 2010

Most of the folks who visit Davis, WV are outdoor enthusiasts. That’s the town’s schtick; it’s a mecca for mountain bikers, hikers, paddlers and skiers — not to mention die-hard hunters and fishermen in season. But not everyone who travels our beautiful country roads is the outdoor type. Some people just like to drive around and sightsee, maybe do a little shopping and eating, then stay overnight at a cozy little bed and breakfast, like the Bright Morning Inn.

Fortunately, there are some good restaurants and handful of interesting shops in Davis and nearby Thomas, enough for a day of exploring. But if you want more, there’s a fascinating area north of town, near Oakland, MD, and home to a small Amish community.

This isn’t commercialized Amish country, with phony “Dutch” windmills and such. It’s an area of rolling farmland called “Pleasant Valley,” with genuine small family farms lining the backroads. Most of the farmers and their wives have sideline businesses, selling vegetables or fabric or picnic furniture. But the folks who sell the rag rugs are my favorite.

The Amish have a remarkable sense of color, and their rugs are beautiful. But just as good, they’re super sturdy, and inexpensive , too. That’s why buying an Amish rug is immensely practical. The fun part comes from entering the home of the rugmaker and digging through piles of rugs the family has made over winter. The Amish who live in Pleasant Valley don’t encounter a lot of tourists, so they’re warm and friendly to outsiders who come to buy their wares — they even appreciate us!

The Bright Morning Inn’s rooms are decorated with a touch of country elegance, with hand-made rugs, cotton quilts and rough hewn pine floors. Since we try to keep things simple, these beautiful rugs are perfect for us. And for you, too, if you’re lucky enough to explore nearby Amish country on your next Davis, WV vacation.

Quilts, Amish rugs and pine floors at the Bright Morning Inn

Amish rugs are known for the beautiful colors and patterns

Ramp Season Comes to Davis

Monday, April 5th, 2010

Early April and ramps we are digging ramps for the Bright Morning Inn restaurant

Early spring in Davis is beautiful, but it’s lackluster when compared to warmer places with their opulent flower spectacles. Our spring is more subtle than that, and it takes forever to get here. That’s why ramps are such a celebration in the mountains. They are proof that the season has finally turned, and they’re a great treat for those of us who seek out wild and local foods.

Ramps are wild leeks, Allium tricoccum to be specific, and members of the lily family. They are a pungent cross between garlic and onion, with delicate strappy green leaves and a white stem that looks a lot like a scallion. Ramps grown on steep rocky hillsides at higher elevations, which makes them a challenge to dig. But they’re worth it. Because they add a marvelous garlicky flavor to bland foods like eggs and potatoes, which is how they’re served at many traditional ramp dinners, called “ramp feeds” by locals.

At the Bright Morning Inn, we scramble them with fresh orange-yolked country eggs and potatoes, or sprinkle them in omelets with bacon and cheese. They’re wildly popular, but they don’t last long. By the middle of May most local ramps have withered or grown too big and stinky, which means one thing: you must eat them, as many as you can, when they’re in season. They’re a spring tonic, and a tangible tie to our forebearers, who relished the first wild greens of the season in all their forms.

On May 2nd the Mount Grove Volunteer Fire Department will host their annual ramp feed near the Tucker County line (about 9 miles north of Davis). From 11 am to 3 pm you can feast on an array of traditional country dishes including fried pototoes, pinto and great northern beans, cornbread, ham and various raw and cooked ramp treats. It’s a truly special slice of West Virginia culture you won’t want to miss. In fact, it has been chronicled in the Spring 2010 issue of Goldenseal, our magazine of West Virginia Traditional Life.



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