Archive for the ‘Monongahela Forest’ Category

Dolly Sods: It Really is For the Birds

Saturday, September 3rd, 2016
It's a long lonely road to the bird banding station...but it's worth it

It’s a long lonely road to the bird banding station…but it’s worth it

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Fine mist nets strung along the Allegheny Front capture migrating birds

Every year in late summer during peak bird migration season the Allegheny Front Migration Observatory comes to life in the scenic Dolly Sods Wilderness. Staffed completely by volunteers, the AFMO is the longest continually operating bird banding station in the United States.

The Allegheny Front in West Virginia sits right in the middle of a major north/south “flyway” and is perfect for capturing birds harmlessly in mist nets, banding them, and sending them on there way. The birds counts are used by various wildlife agencies to track species and numbers of songbirds and raptors from Canada to South America.

Banding activity takes place every day from dawn until noon, though the most activity occurs in the early hours. This year the station closes in early October. To get to the station, take FS 19 to 75, about 8 miles up the lonely gravel road that runs through Dolly Sods. It is located across the road from the Red Creek Campground and the entrance to Blackbird Knob Trail.

If you’ve never been to the Dolly Sods before you may wonder if you’ll ever get to the end of the road. You will. It ends at Bear Rocks, a vast open heath with fantastic rock formations along the Allegheny Front. It’s an amazing site, one of the most photographed places in West Virginia. And a stop at the bird migration station will make the trip even more memorable.

They were teaching STEM before STEM was cool!

Saturday, June 13th, 2015

Unlikely as it may seem, in 1963 a small group of forward-thinking West Virginians created one of the most successful STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education programs in the country. It is the National Youth Science Camp, which for over 50 years has brought together the top science students from every state for four weeks of intensive study and outdoor recreation. A program free to the aspiring scientists, and run by a dedicated staph (their word), the camp is a bona fide success story. Of its alumni, 45% have achieved doctorates, and 85% are working in STEM-related occupations.
Plans are now underway for the camp, and the National Youth Science Foundation that runs it, to move to a permanent home in Tucker County, on the edge of Davis, WV, and near Blackwater Falls. The goal is to construct a National Center for Youth Sciences Education that will improve and expand existing programs with permanent year-round facilities.
It’s a brilliant idea. Tucker County is one of the most beautiful and unspoiled areas in our state, surrounded by nearly a million acres of Monongahela Forest and close to two National Wilderness areas. It’s a great location for recreation and will provide a fantastic laboratory for environmental education. To find out more go the NYSF website, and if you’re inclined, donate to their cause. With their proven track record, it’s a sound investment, and a patriotic way for you to help move our nation’s STEM education forward.



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